Archive for 'Desktop'

Tidy up your iPhoto library before switching to Photos for OS X | Software News | TechRadar

You might have had a bit of a shock on attempting to launch iPhoto on an iPhone or iPad after upgrading to iOS 8. The app was abruptly dead and inaccessible, superseded by Photos, which gained filters and more editing capabilities. In 2015, Apple will bring similar thinking to the Mac, replacing iPhoto with an OS X version of Photos.

Generally, when a desktop app is retired, it doesn’t suddenly stop working and force you to migrate to an alternative product. Chances are, you’ll still be able to continue using iPhoto for a while – although that’s not guaranteed. However, it’s clear that if you’re an iPhoto user on OS X Yosemite, you should start planning ahead, because Apple’s made it clear iPhoto has no future.

via Tidy up your iPhoto library before switching to Photos for OS X | Software News | TechRadar.

Easy Mac Hacks: Get the RSS Screensaver Back in Yosemite | Mac|Life

In OS X Tiger, Apple introduced a new screen saver to help show off the new RSS reader abilities in Safari. The RSS visualizer screen saver was designed to read in an RSS feed and display its contents whenever your screen saver would appear. Apple discontinued this screen saver back in Lion, at the same time they stopped including an RSS reader in Safari. For those who would like to reminisce, you can get this screen saver back on your system, and we’ll show you how to do it in this article.

via Easy Mac Hacks: Get the RSS Screensaver Back in Yosemite | Mac|Life.

How to Secure Your Mac | Mac|Life

When you first set up your Mac, the only security measure that’s enforced is that you add a password to your user account. The Setup Assistant makes no mention of extra measures you might want to enable, even though several are built into OS X. The features we’re about to look at are defenses against local attacks, rather than protection against online attacks. The measures are particularly important if you work in an open environment, such as a library, an office, or a café, and if your Mac is stolen, because they help to keep your data under lock and key.

via How to Secure Your Mac | Mac|Life.

How to install Yosemite on a USB 3.0 flash drive | Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004

How to install Yosemite on a USB 3.0 flash drive | Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004.

How to use the OS X character viewer – CNET

The keyboard offers a number of common characters for the language layout you have chosen, especially when you use modifier keys such as Shift, Command, and Option to invoke alternative character sets; however, while those that are mapped to various keys are common, they are only a minor subset of the characters that are available for you to use when composing documents.

via How to use the OS X character viewer – CNET.

Google 2 Step Authentication — The Gadgeteer

Google 2 step authentication works on 2 things, something you know – your password – and something you have – your phone/tablet.

It’s easy to turn on from your Google Account Settings

via Google 2 Step Authentication Review — The Gadgeteer.

How to: Enable Dropbox Two-Step Authentication — The Gadgeteer

After a security breach with Dropbox, they’ve now given you the option of adding two-step authentication to your account.  The two-step authentication codes can be obtained via SMS, Google Authenticator, Amazon’s AWS MFA, and Windows 7 Authenticator.

via How to: Enable Dropbox Two-Step Authentication — The Gadgeteer.

Avoid triggering Hot Corners accidentally – Mac OS X Hints

Many of us use Hot Corners (accessed from System Preferences -> Mission Control or System Preferences -> Desktop & Screen Savers) to trigger various actions. On my Mac, slamming the mouse to the bottom right corner reveals the desktop; the bottom left corner triggers Mission Control. You can also use the corners to trigger things like Notification Center, Launchpad, starting a screen saver, or putting your display to sleep.

But anyone who uses Hot Corners (which OS X refers to interchangeably as Active Screen Corners) triggers those mouse-controlled shortcuts accidentally sometimes. The solution is this: When you’re choosing a Hot Corner setting from one of the drop-down menus, hold down your preferred modifier key or keys. You’ll see the options change from, say, Mission Control to Option Mission Control” instead.

From then on, your corner will only work when you’re also holding down the modifier key(s) you specified. Now, trips to the Apple menu won’t trigger your Hot Corner shortcut—unless you’re pressing your selected modifier key, too.

via Avoid triggering Hot Corners accidentally – Mac OS X Hints.

Aptonic Software – Dropzone

Dropzone makes it faster and easier to get things done on your Mac

Drag a file onto the menu item and your fully customizable grid of destinations flies smoothly out using core animation.

Drop the file onto a destination and Dropzone will take care of the rest. Whether you’re installing an app, uploading a file to an FTP server or sharing your photos on Flickr.

via Aptonic Software – Dropzone.

FoldingText — Plain text productivity for geeks

Plain text productivity for geeks. As you type, FoldingText auto-formats your document into sections, lists, and paragraphs. Fold sections to see the big picture. Focus to see the details.

via FoldingText — Plain text productivity for geeks.