Archive for April, 2012

30 Great Open Source Mac Apps | Mac.AppStorm

An open source application is a piece of software for which the source code is available and in the public domain. Developers are able to download the code and modify, contribute and change it to suit their needs. This means businesses can ‘tweak’ software according to their needs and individuals can play around with code, add new features and explore how software works. Open source software is also the foundation to many of today’s largest, most renowned software packages – without open source software we might not have the amazing, mind-blowing applications and software packages we use everyday.

via 30 Great Open Source Mac Apps | Mac.AppStorm.

Designing a Mobile App? Don’t Make These 10 Mistakes

So you’ve already learned how to navigate the tricky world of cross-platform app design and worked through all of the common pitfalls of developing your app. You have a vision, some inspiration and maybe even a name that you know will be perfect. So … now what?

via Designing a Mobile App? Don’t Make These 10 Mistakes.

Creating a business plan | News | TechRadar

Businesses plans are a bit like exams, nobody wants to do them, but we all know they’re a necessary path to get your business to the next level, and to get that much needed business funding. However it shouldn’t be like that. Business plans are not complicated to produce, and a good, regularly-updated business plan will help you focus your business, and help you confront and solve some of the things that are holding back the business.

via Creating a business plan | News | TechRadar.

Nielsen is wrong on mobile | Opinion | .net magazine

Designer, developer and mobile maven Josh Clark tells us that rather than stripping down, we should be asking how we can do more with the mobile experience

via Nielsen is wrong on mobile | Opinion | .net magazine.

How Recruiters See Your Resume – Business Insider

Although we may never know why we didn’t get chosen for a job interview, a recent study is shedding some light on recruiters’ decision-making behavior. According to TheLadders research, recruiters spend an average of “six seconds before they make the initial ‘fit or no fit’ decision” on candidates.

The study used a scientific technique called “eye tracking” on 30 professional recruiters and examined their eye movements during a 10-week period to “record and analyze where and how long someone focuses when digesting a piece of information or completing a task.”

via How Recruiters See Your Resume – Business Insider.